News & Events

  • In a New York Times op-ed co-written with Nicholas Jahr, Professor Diederick J. Vandewalle states that, "despite severe security issues and other debilitating weaknesses, Libya these days has one unexpected strength: Most of its people agree on major issues that are often hopelessly divisive, like minority rights, Islam and federalism."

  • In The National Interest, Professor Jennifer Lind asks whether East Asia can move past its history problem. Lind writes, "The United States should help its allies and partners deal with the region’s history problem, and in doing so, can take advantage of an unusual opportunity to advance both its strategic and normative interests."

  • Professor Daryl Press was quoted in a story in The Atlantic on the crisis in the Ukraine: “A country’s credibility, at least during crises, is driven not by its past behavior but rather by its power and interests. If a country makes threats that it has the power to carry out—and an interest in doing so—those threats will be believed even if the country has bluffed in...

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  • In a New York Times opinion piece, Dartmouth’s Brendan Nyhan says the United States’ denouncement of anti-Semitic flyers distributed in Ukraine—which are now thought to have been a hoax—may have unfortunate results.

    “First, the statements bring more attention to an apparently bogus story,” writes Nyhan, an assistant professor of government. “Even if news...

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  • Shoshana Silverstein ’15 has been chosen as a 2014 Harry S. Truman Scholar. She is one of 59 college students, mostly juniors, awarded scholarships of up to $30,000 to pursue graduate studies in public service fields. The program also provides assistance with career counseling, internship placement, graduate school admissions, and professional development.

    President Phil Hanlon ’77 met with Silverstein earlier this week to congratulate her. “It’s a thrill to have a Dartmouth student...

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  • When professors Doug IrwinMeir Kohn, and Russell Muirhead get together to explain their new Political Economy Project, the interview quickly becomes a free-form conversation that explores the medieval marketplace, the economies of cities, and political responses to the recent financial crisis.

    This passion...

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  • Assistant Professor of Government Brendan Nyhan will be a contributor for The New York Times’ new “data-driven politics and policy website,” reports Capital.

    The announcement of the appointment was made by the Times’ David Leonhardt, the article notes. Leonhardt says in a memo that “Brendan Nyhan has established a reputation as one of the most thought-provoking writers about politics on the web,” Capital reports.

    ...

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  • A new study led by Dartmouth’s Brendan Nyhan suggests that public health messages aimed at increasing childhood vaccinations are actually having the reverse effect, reports NBC News.

    The study found that the messages increased fears among wary parents, the article notes. “If these messages were working, they should increase the intent to vaccinate,” Nyhan, an assistant professor of government, tells NBC News. “This highlights the extent to which we...

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  • Researchers at Dartmouth and the University of Florida say recent voting law changes in North Carolina will disproportionately affect African-Americans, reports MSNBC.

    “We tried to figure out using publicly available voting data if the aspects we studied looked like they would have disproportionate effect on one racial group or whether they would be race neutral,” Michael Herron tells MSNBC. Herron is a professor of government and...

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  • A new study by researchers from Dartmouth and two Australian universities provides the first empirical evidence using data from a variety of countries that foreign aid can greatly improve foreign public opinion of donor countries.

    The findings are based on a U.S. foreign aid program targeting HIV and AIDS—the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)—that has substantially improved public perception of the United States in the more than 80 developing countries receiving the...

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