Faculty

Daryl Press in "The Atlantic"

“A country’s credibility, at least during crises, is driven not by its past behavior but rather by its power and interests. If a country makes threats that it has the power to carry out—and an interest in doing so—those threats will be believed even if the country has bluffed in the past," says Associate Professor Daryl Press in an article on The Atlantic

Vandewalle on Libya’s Unexpected Strength

In a New York Times op-ed co-written with Nicholas Jahr, Professor Diederick J. Vandewalle states that, "despite severe security issues and other debilitating weaknesses, Libya these days has one unexpected strength: Most of its people agree on major issues that are often hopelessly divisive, like minority rights, Islam and federalism."

Can East Asia Move Past Its History Problem?

In The National Interest, Professor Jennifer Lind asks whether East Asia can move past its history problem. Lind writes, "The United States should help its allies and partners deal with the region’s history problem, and in doing so, can take advantage of an unusual opportunity to advance both its strategic and normative interests."

Daryl G. Press Quoted in The Atlantic

Professor Daryl Press was quoted in a story in The Atlantic on the crisis in the Ukraine: “A country’s credibility, at least during crises, is driven not by its past behavior but rather by its power and interests. If a country makes threats that it has the power to carry out—and an interest in doing so—those threats will be believed even if the country has bluffed in the past…. Tragically, those countries that have fought wars to build a reputation for resolve have wasted vast sums of money and, much worse, thousands of lives.” Read the rest of Peter Beinart's article, "The U.S. Doesn't Need to Prove Itself in the Ukraine," here.

Political Economy Project Takes On Big Questions

When professors Doug IrwinMeir Kohn, and Russell Muirhead get together to explain their new Political Economy Project, the interview quickly becomes a free-form conversation that explores the medieval marketplace, the economies of cities, and political responses to the recent financial crisis.

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